Tyranny
!tyranny
help-circle
rss
Brazenly exploiting a loophole in anti-gun logic, a man who only identified himself as “Kem” to WKTV said he made the “firearms” out of parts he printed on a $200 3D printer he received for Christmas. “I 3D-printed a bunch of lower receivers and frames for different kinds of firearms,” he said. Kem then drove six hours to Utica, New York, where the state’s attorney general’s office was holding a no-questions-asked gun buyback event. “They buy from you as many guns as you want to surrender,” WKTV reports. A man took home $21,000 in gift cards after bringing more than 100 3D-printed guns to the state attorney general’s buyback event in Utica last month. “Nobody thought this through,” the man said. “When you look at the flyer, it is just the gravest thing Letitia James could have done. She literally put a bounty on 3D-printed guns… She said, ‘I will give you extra money if it doesn’t have a serial number on it.'”

### Key Takeaways - Mexican digital rights organization R3D (Red en los Defensa de los Derechos Digitales) has identified Pegasus infections against journalists and a human rights defender taking place between 2019-2021. - The Citizen Lab provided technical support for R3D’s analysis and validated the infections. - Victims include two journalists that report on issues related to official corruption and a prominent human rights defender. - The infections occurred years after the first revelations of Pegasus abuses in Mexico. - They also occurred after Mexico’s current President, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, assured the public that the government no longer used the spyware and that there would be no further abuses.

A lawsuit that was filed after FBI agents raided a vault company, seizing more than $86 million in cash as well as jewelry and gold from 1,400 safe-deposit boxes, says the owners' items have still not been returned and that agents misled a judge to get the warrant. Agents raided the Beverly Hills, California, branch of US Private Vaults in March 2021 and seized assets from boxes held by hundreds of people who were not suspected in any crimes, court papers reported on by the Los Angeles Times say. The lawsuit alleges the FBI and the US attorney's office in Los Angeles obtained search-and-seizure warrants against US Private Vaults by concealing critical details from the judge who approved them. Robert Frommer, a lawyer with the Institute for Justice, which filed the lawsuit, said in the court papers: "The government did not know what was in those boxes, who owned them, or what, if anything, those people had done."

According to a message on the tor-relays mailing list, a Tor exit node operator in Germany was raided by the police. Volker wrote that law enforcement officers raided him because “some Nazis used TOR to send nazi-emails to several schools in Germany.” Authorities accused him of Volksverhetzung, which is “incitement to hatred” (which in Germany means “insulting… segments of the population”).

Codogno, a town in Italy’s north, is introducing a social credit style app, local authorities have announced. It will be happening via the EcoAttivi app, to be used “to certify virtuous behavior” via geo-localization and QR codes. The app’s users will be given “points” if they behave a certain, proscribed way in their environmental, cultural, and social activities, and in exchange, the “virtuous behavior” will get rewarded by discount coupons. Business entities will be giving these discounts – and then the municipality will refund the money to those companies.

Australia’s major banks: ANZ, CBA, NAB and Westpac, are happy with EFTPOS’ payment system known as ConnectID to provide the national digital ID. What EFTPOS (stylized as, “eftpos”) stands for is, “electronic funds transfer at point of sale” – (if you’re in Singapore, you might know it as “NETS”). It’s an electronic payment system involving electronic fund transfers based on the use of debit or credit cards, at payment terminals located at points of sale. Australia’s Payments Plus (AP+) – described as a broker for digital identity initiatives both behind EFTPOS and BPAY – made the announcement. And BPAY is an Australian electronic bill payment company working with online financial institutions, mobile or telephone banking with registered billers. With that information and “banking cabal” circle complete – let’s see what Australia’s big bank’s digital ID actually means – especially for those who cannot escape it. It’s supposed to be a “seamless online identity verification experience” – as AP+ CEO Lynn Kraus put in, in quotations cited by biometrics industry-friendly media outlets.

The data broker Fog Data Science has been selling access to what it claims are billions of location data points from over 250 million smartphones to local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies around the US. The data comes from tech companies and cell phone towers and is collected in the Fog Reveal tool from thousands of iOS and Android apps. Crucially, access to the service is cheap, often costing local police departments less than $10,000 per year, and investigations by the Associated Press and Electronic Frontier Foundation found that law enforcement sometimes pulls location data without a warrant. The EFF conducted its investigation through more than 100 public records requests filed over several months. “Troublingly, those records show that Fog and some law enforcement did not believe Fog’s surveillance implicated people’s Fourth Amendment rights and required authorities to get a warrant,” the EFF wrote.

More than 22,000 customers of Xcel Energy were locked out of their smart thermostats during an “energy emergency” on Tuesday, the company confirmed to local media. “Due to a rare energy emergency that may affect the local energy grid, your temperature slider has been changed from 8:00 pm – 8:00 pm because you enrolled in a Community Energy Savings program.” Participants in the program receive a one-off $100 bill credit and a meager $25 annual reward in exchange for surrendering control of their thermostats to Xcel.

Canada’s Minister for Public Safety Marco Mendicino said that there would be a new bill targeting legal content on the internet that will be rushed through parliament this fall. Mendicino said that the new bill would “ensure” Canadians have “robust free speech.” But, he then said the bill would “also delineate some clear boundaries on what is not acceptable.” Some have speculated that Mendicino’s new bill will be an introduction of the controversial Bill C-36, which was “an Act to amend the Criminal Code and the Canadian Human Rights Act and to make related amendments to another Act (hate propaganda, hate crimes and hate speech).” If it passed, those found guilty of online hate would face house arrest and fines of up to $70,000.

Kollona Amn – which roughly translates to “We Are All Security” in Arabic – was launched by the Saudi Interior Ministry in 2017, but the last few years have seen a “dramatic” surge in court cases referencing the app, according to legal-rights activists. The app “encourages everyday citizens to play the role of police and become active participants in their own repression. Putting the state’s eyes everywhere also creates a pervasive sense of uncertainty – there is always a potential informant in the room or following your social media accounts,” said Noura Aljizawi, a researcher at Citizen Lab, which focuses on threats to free speech online. The Orwellian nature of the app is such that users often report on people “defensively,” fearing they could face punishment themselves for merely overhearing speech deemed offensive to the regime. In some cases, the app has also been used for “blackmail” and to “settle scores,” Insider noted. Despite its role in crushing dissent in the repressive Gulf monarchy, the app is still sold by both Google and Apple, neither of which responded to Insider’s requests for comment. Google, moreover, is set to open two new offices in Saudi Arabia sometime this year, and is now working on a controversial data partnership with the state-run oil firm Saudi Aramco. The tech giant insists it will safeguard user data, but some activists say the move will “risk lives” and hand the government additional tools to spy on citizens. In some cases, privacy concerns have led activists to keep two or three phones – one containing government apps and others without them – in an attempt to avoid the Kingdom’s totalitarian surveillance, facilitated by American companies.

The new strict hijab law was signed by Iran’s hardline president Ebrahim Raisi on August 15. It followed the Hijab and Chastity Day, a national holiday held on July 12, which saw women protest all over the country by posting on social media pictures of themselves without the head covering. Some of the women that have been arrested for violating the new law were identified after videos showing them without the hijab or wearing the hijab the wrong way went viral on social media. One woman, whose video showed her being harassed on public transportation for not wearing the hijab properly, was arrested, beaten, and forced to apologize on national television to the person who harassed her, The Guardian reported.

Meta and Twitter have taken down accounts in recent weeks connected to a years-long, pro-Western covert influence network originating in the U.S. that targeted the Middle East and Central Asia, according to a new report from the Stanford Internet Observatory and data analysis firm Graphika. Rather than one single campaign, the data provided by the companies showed a series of overlapping efforts that used deceptive tactics, including computer generated profile images and fake news outlets, to promote an agenda aligned with Western policy priorities and opposing Iran, China and Russia. “The accounts heavily criticized Russia in particular for the deaths of innocent civilians and other atrocities its soldiers committed in pursuit of the Kremlin’s ‘imperial ambitions’ following its invasion of Ukraine in February this year,” according to the report. “To promote this and other narratives, the accounts sometimes shared news articles from U.S. government-funded media outlets, such as Voice of America and Radio Free Europe, and links to websites sponsored by the U.S. military,” researchers added.

The case is People v. Seymour, and it is perhaps the first U.S. case to address the constitutionality of a keyword warrant. The case involves a tragic home arson in which several people died. Police didn’t have a suspect, so they used a keyword warrant to ask Google for identifying information on anyone and everyone who searched for variations on the home’s street address in the two weeks prior to the arson. Like geofence warrants, keyword warrants cast a dragnet that requires a provider to search its entire reserve of user data—in this case queries by one billion Google users. As in this case, the police generally have no identified suspects when they obtain a keyword search warrant. Instead, the sole basis for the warrant is the officer’s hunch that the suspect might have searched for something in some way related to the crime.

In February of last year, Google’s algorithms wrongly flagged photos taken by two fathers in two different states as being images of child abuse. In both cases, the fathers—one in San Francisco, one in Houston—had small children with infections on their genitals, and had taken photos of the area at the request of medical professionals. Google’s algorithms, and the employees who oversee them, had a different opinion about the photos. Without informing either parent, Google reported them to the government. That resulted in local police departments investigating the parents.

[WASHINGTON, D.C. – Aug. 2, 2022] Project Veritas released a newly leaked document today provided by an FBI whistleblower, which shows how the Bureau classifies American citizens it deems to be potential “Militia Violent Extremists” [MVEs].

A federal district court in California on Friday denied Google's motion to dismiss a lawsuit alleging that the Silicon Valley giant is violating federal antitrust laws by preventing fair competition against its YouTube video platform. The lawsuit against Google, which has owned YouTube since its 2006 purchase for $1.65 billion, was brought in early 2021 by Rumble, the free speech competitor to YouTube. Its central claim is that Google's abuse of its monopolistic stranglehold on search engines to destroy all competitors to its various other platforms is illegal under the Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890, which makes it unlawful to “monopolize, or attempt to monopolize…any part of the trade or commerce among the several States, or with foreign nations.”

"Paving The Road To Hell": Digital ID Systems Could Lead To Severe, Irreversible Human Rights Violations
https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/paving-road-hell-digital-id-systems-could-lead-severe-irreversible-human-rights According to the report, the digital ID has been dressed up as an “unstoppable juggernaut and inevitable hallmark of modernity and development in the 21st century,” causing dissenting voices to be “written off as Luddites and barriers to progress.”

Twitter has imposed a blockade on all content from The Epoch Times without explanation, raising further concerns about freedom of speech on the platform.

According to a report by the company, there was a 103% increase in the number of legal demands targeting verified journalists. The platform received 47,572 demands targeting 198,931 accounts. 11,460 of those demands were made by governments, with 20% coming from the US government. The platform received 11,500 requests for information on accounts during the same period, which was a 7% decrease from the first half of 2021. Most of these requests for information made by governments were made by the US government. Twitter reported that it opposed 29 requests for account information from the US government. But it complied with 69% of these requests.

A report by the Tony Blair Institute has recommended the adoption of digital IDs to help solve the problem of illegal immigration in the UK. The report argues that one of the reasons the UK has an illegal immigration problem is the government’s failure to do away with a black market of agencies and employers who give jobs to illegal immigrants. So, it proposes a “digital identity verification” system that would be mandatory for every UK resident seeking work or benefits. To obtain the digital ID, an immigrant would have to prove that they reside in the UK legally through the verification of their passport or an equivalent document. However, all citizens would have to have a digital ID.

The best-known definition of tyranny comes from Aristotle’s Politics:

“Any sole ruler, who is not required to give an account of himself, and who rules over subjects all equal or superior to himself to suit his own interest and not theirs, can only be exercising a tyranny.”

Rules

  1. Follow the golden rule, do unto others as you would have done unto you
  2. Smut, Porn, Gore etc. will result in Ban without warning
  3. No Spamming, Trolling or Unsolicited Ads (There are marketplaces in matrix and telegram you can use)
  4. Stay on topic in a community. If you would like a new community made, reach out to an admin and the creation of a net new community can be discussed.
  • 0 users online
  • 2 users / day
  • 2 users / week
  • 3 users / month
  • 4 users / 6 months
  • 13 subscribers
  • 47 Posts
  • 3 Comments
  • Modlog