Introduction to Kabbalah Part I: The Tree of Life & the Hebrew Letters In this webinar, we will be covering the basic of the Mystical Kabbalah including: - The Purpose of Kabbalah - Kabbalistic perspectives of Freemasons and Esotericists such as Albert Pike, Eliphas Levi, MacGregor Mathers, Israel Regardie - The Primary Types of Kabbalah - Introduction to the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, the Sepher Yetzirah, the 10 Sephiroth, 22 Paths - Learning the Hebrew Letters - Elemental, Zodiacal and Planetary meanings - The Tree of Life in 4 Worlds - Practical Applications of the Tree Intended for beginners and anyone interested in Kabbalah or the Western Esoteric Traditions!

Introduction to Kabbalah Part I: The Tree of Life & the Hebrew Letters

In this webinar, we will be covering the basic of the Mystical Kabbalah including:

  • The Purpose of Kabbalah
  • Kabbalistic perspectives of Freemasons and Esotericists such as Albert Pike, Eliphas Levi, MacGregor Mathers, Israel Regardie
  • The Primary Types of Kabbalah - Introduction to the Kabbalistic Tree of Life, the Sepher Yetzirah, the 10 Sephiroth, 22 Paths
  • Learning the Hebrew Letters
  • Elemental, Zodiacal and Planetary meanings
  • The Tree of Life in 4 Worlds
  • Practical Applications of the Tree

Intended for beginners and anyone interested in Kabbalah or the Western Esoteric Traditions!

The word occult comes from the Latin word occultus (clandestine, hidden, secret), referring to “knowledge of the hidden” or “hidden knowledge”.

The term occult sciences was used in 16th-century Europe to refer to astrology, alchemy, and natural magic, which today are considered pseudosciences. The term occultism emerged in 19th-century France, amongst figures such as Antoine Court de Gébelin. It came to be associated with various French esoteric groups connected to Éliphas Lévi and Papus, and in 1875 was introduced into the English language by the esotericist Helena Blavatsky.

Throughout the 20th century, the term was used idiosyncratically by a range of different authors, but by the 21st century was commonly employed – including by academic scholars of esotericism – to refer to a range of esoteric currents that developed in the mid-19th century and their descendants. Occultism is thus often used to categorise such esoteric traditions as Spiritualism, Theosophy, Anthroposophy, the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, and New Age.

Rules

  1. Follow the golden rule, do unto others as you would have done unto you
  2. Smut, Porn, Gore etc. will result in Ban without warning
  3. No Spamming, Trolling or Unsolicited Ads (There are marketplaces in matrix and telegram you can use)
  4. Stay on topic in a community. If you would like a new community made, reach out to an admin and the creation of a net new community can be discussed.
  • 0 users online
  • 1 user / day
  • 1 user / week
  • 2 users / month
  • 2 users / 6 months
  • 12 subscribers
  • 24 Posts
  • 0 Comments
  • Modlog